A Junior Gaelic Grammar (Elementary Course of Gaelic)

Feb 27, 2013 by

jrgaelicA Junior Gaelic Grammar ELEMENTARY COURSE OF GAELIC by Duncan Reid first published in 1913 is another great find for anyone interested in the beautiful Gaelic Language.  If you want to learn Gaelic, this is the textbook for you.

Here is an example of the lesson on consonant pronunciation:

CONSONANT SOUNDS
B, sounds almost as sharp as p in English.
Bh, is like v ; sometimes the sound of hh in the middle and at the end of certain words is like u, and sometimes it is silent.
Fh, is silent, except in the three words, fhein, fhuair, fhaihast, when it has the sound of h.
M, is like m in English.
Mh, is like v, and more nasal than bh. It is silent in the middle and end of some words, and gives a nasal sound to the vowel. In some districts it has the sound of u ; as, samhradh, pronounced saiiradh.
P, is like p in English.
Ph, is like /in English.
C, is always hard ; before a, o, u, it has the sound of c in can ; after a, o, u, it has the same sound in some districts ; as, cnoc, like ck in lock ; but more generally the sound of chk ; before e, i, and after i, like c in came.
Ch, preceded or followed by a, o, u, has a guttural sound like ch in loch ; in contact with e, i, it has a more slender sound.
Chd, has the sound of chk ; as, luchd, pronounced luchk.
G, has a flatter sound than c, before and after a, o, u, it is like g in got ; in contact with e, i, it sounds nearly like g in get.
Gh, is flatter than ch ; before and after e, i, it has the sound of y in English ; in contact with a, o, u, it has a broader sound. In the middle and end of certain words it is silent.
T, has a flatter sound than t in English ; when preceded or followed by a, o, u, the sound is Hhe th in than but stronger, and is produced by putting the point of the tongue against or between the teeth ; in contact with e, i, it has the sound of ch in chin.
Th, beginning a word has the sound of h ; silent in the pronoun tho, and in certain tenses of irregular verbs when preceded by d’. In the middle of some words it has a slight aspiration, in others it is silent.
D, is the flat sound ; in the same position it has almost the same sound as t, but softer.”

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