Civil War Household Tips

Sep 6, 2014 by

Every once in a while, in everyone’s life, there comes a time for a strange remedy. You know what I mean – an out-of-the-box answer to a question you find yourself pondering for days. Modern medicine just doesn’t seem to be fixing it – so what do you do? This, my friends, just might be the book to answer all your questions. Imagine…it’s the mid 19th century, 1860’s to be precise. Please keep in mind penicillin was not discovered by Alexander Fleming until 1928.  We take it all for granted now don’t we? we take for granted…small infections that disappear as soon as the doctor prescribes antibiotic cream, or perhaps you have some… shall we say “un-named” infection that is causing a blip in your regular day. You simply run to the doctor or...

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The Curiosities of Ale & Beer: An Entertaining History...

Nov 29, 2013 by

The Curiosities of Ale & Beer: An Entertaining History  Originally published back in 1889, this book by John Bickerdyke and is a really fascinating peek into the world of beer and ale. Starting in ancient Egypt, Bickerdyke traces the evolution of beer and brewing up through the late 1800s. Along the way, he illuminates nearly every facet of beer’s colorful saga — ancient recipes, hops and malt, beer laws and regulations, drinking customs, beer songs and ballads, “ale-wives,” inns and taverns, porter and stout, ancient drinking vessels, brewers of old London, and much more. Here are a few paragraphs from the introduction: “Almost every inhabitant of this country has tasted beer of some kind or another, but on the subject of brewing the great majority have ideas both vague and curious. About one person...

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The Rural School Lunch

Nov 7, 2013 by

The Rural School Lunch by Nellie Wing Farnsworth was originally published in 1916.  What a find! Nellie wrote this as a guidebook for teachers and school administrators during the early 1900’s so that they would be able to make warm school lunches for the students. It has some great basic good recipes too using all natural ingredients. I’ve posted the potato soup recipe below as well as a few paragraphs from the opening of the book: “On the principle that anything worth doing is worth doing well, it might follow that anything that must be done must be done well. We do not live to eat, but we must eat to live. Study, work, play are all alike destructive of bodily tissue and necessitate repair. Children must have extra food for growth besides repair,...

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Breakfast Dainties

Sep 13, 2013 by

You have to love an old cookbook that is called “Breakfast Dainties!”  Written by Thomas Murrey and first published in 1885, this is a marvelous peek into what they called breakfast cookery in the late 19th century.  Looking at the list of recipes in this book, it looks as if back in 1885 what they had for breakfast was similar to what we have now for dinner! A few words from the introduction: “Dinner may be pleasant, So may social tea But yet me thinks the breakfast Is best of all the three. The importance of preparing a variety of dainty dishes for the breakfast table is but lightly considered by many who can afford luxuries, quite as much as by those who little dream of the delightful, palate-pleasing compounds made from unconsidered trifles....

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The Hygienic Cookbook (1864)

Sep 13, 2013 by

I just love the name of this old cookbook from 1864! The hygienic cook-book; containing recipes for making bread, pies, puddings, mushes, and soups, with directions for cooking vegetables, canning fruit, etc. To which is added an appendix, containing valuable suggestions in regard to washing, bleaching, removing ink, fruit, and other stains from from garments, etc (1864) And a few fascinating words from the introduction: “The table! how vast an influence it exerts on human life and character ; how much, of the woe of humanity clusters around it ! In determining our physical, mental, and moral conditions, no other one thing in all the material universe has so vast a power as that which we take daily in the shape of food and drink. Much, very much, of the sickness, suffering, and premature...

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Easy Entertaining (1911)

Sep 10, 2013 by

Easy Entertaining by Caroline French Benton is a wonderful old book originally published in 1911.  It gives you an incredible peek into what life and entertaining was like back in the early 1900’s.  Here is an example of some of what is covered in this book: Setting the Table Spring Luncheons A Spring Luncheon Costing Three Dollars Easter Time Easter Menus Easter Luncheons and Breakfasts Entertaining on May Day Luncheons for May Days Spring Menus for Four Weeks Mid-summer Luncheon The Cold Dinner Little Dinners for Three Dollars A Bride’s Dinner Veranda Luncheons Picnic Limcheons Picnic Luncheons Summer Menus for Four Weeks Two September Functions An Autumn Dinner and Luncheon A Country Dinner and Supper for October Hallowe’en Suppers The Thanksgiving Dinner The Thanksgiving Dinner BUY this BOOK...

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Grape Culture and Wine Making in California...

Jun 17, 2013 by

Grape Culture and Wine Making in California by George Husmann was originally published in 1888. Really interesting read if you are interested in the early years of California’s wine making history. From the preface: “A book, specially devoted to “Grape Culture and Wine Making in California,” would seem to need no apology for its appearance, however much the author may do so for under- taking the task. California seems to him, at least, as ”the chosen land of the Lord,” the great Vineland ; and the industry, now only in its first stages of development, destined to overshadow all others. It has already assumed dimensions, within the short period of its existence, hardly forty years, that our European brethren can not believe it, and a smile of incredulity comes to their lips when we...

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Bread Facts

Jun 14, 2013 by

YUM! Who doesn’t love a nice warm piece of bread?  If you are a carbohydrate aficionado you may enjoy this interesting old book first published in 1920 – so these are Bread Facts from the early 1900’s – not from today! Here are a a few charming notes from BREAD FACTS on the food value of bread: “THE FOOD VALUE OF BREAD Life is built up in steps; first from the soil, in the form of the plants; and then from the plant into the form of animal, and most animal life goes farther and feeds on other animals. Even in human nutrition the most economic way is to utilize, direct, larger quantities of grain, roots and plants for food. Take a bushel of wheat, for example: the human system converts over 90 per...

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The Peerless Pastry Book

May 23, 2013 by

The Peerless Pastry Book Containing Recipes for Baking and Pastry Work by John Blitzner was originally published in 1910 and is a classic among pastry chefs.  This is an awesome little cookbook if you want to make your own flaky delights! Here is just one of his recipes for puff pastry: NO. 1 PUFF PASTE Wash 3 lbs. butter in cold water, work it on a table until dry. Take 3 lbs. dry flour, 4 oz. of the butter, and about 1 1/2 pint of ice water and work it into a smooth paste, form it into a loaf and allow it to rest for about a half hour. Then roll out the paste to the size of 1/2 ft. square, place the butter in the middle fold, the edges over the butter, then...

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Nature’s Own Book

May 12, 2013 by

So, Nature’s Own Book was actually written by Asenath Nicholson and on February 13, 1835 he deposited his book at the Southern New York Copyright office, and it was checked in by Fred J. Betts.  Soooo, with all apologies to Mr. Nicholson it appears Fred Betts is getting the credit for this book.  But! have not fear, the inside is pure Asenath Nicholson and you won’t be disappointed in his dietary gems. Mr. Nicholson has a number of “Rules” he swears by, and here is a peek at just a few of his rules: “Rule VI. No boarder should sleep on a feather bed during any part of the year ; but his bed should be a hair, moss, or straw mattrass, or any thing harder if he chooses. Rule VII. Breakfast. No animal...

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The Opium Habit and Alcoholism

Apr 26, 2013 by

The Opium Habit and Alcoholism by Fred Heman Hubbard was originally published in 1881 and is a stunning late 19th century treatise on drug and alcohol addiction.  Here are a few paragraphs from the introduction to give you an idea of the vibe of the book: “In writing a memoir on the diseased state of the system engendered by the habitual use of powerful drugs and stimulating liquors, and indicating a rational treatment for the same, the author has kept one object steadily in view; he has sought to make his work useful, and to place in the hands of the profession a carefully arranged analysis of the peculiar physical condition induced by such indulgence, a condition which makes necessary each day a certain measure of stimulative, to sustain the system in its abnormal...

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Profitable Herb Growing and Collecting...

Apr 8, 2013 by

Profitable Herb Growing and Collecting by Ada Teetgen was originally published in 1916 and is a wonderful resource for those of us who enjoy growing and collecting herbs. Here are the chapters to give you a better idea on what Ada covers in this vintage gem: I. Herb Collecting Generally II. Herbs in the Various Systems of Medicine, and the Herbalists, Ancient and Modern Note on American Herbs and their Reintroduction and Cultivation in England Non-official Plants— Botanic Pharmacopoeia — Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia III. Weed Collecting Popular Names of Plants How to Identify Plants Herb Gardens How to Collect Prices Economic Market for Herbs Collector’s Outfit How to Pack Herbs How to Treat the Various Parts of Herbs required by the Druggists, Roots, Barks, Leaves, Flowers, Seeds IV. Methods of Drying Herbs Drying Machine Temperature...

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