The First Book of Bees

May 2, 2015 by

The First Book of Bees by Albert B. Tibbets was originally published in 1952 and is a wonderful resource for anyone young or old interested in bees. Mr. Tibbets style is very conversational and chatty, as evidenced in his cute dedication at the beginning of the book: “To my wife Helen, my busiest little bee” Here are a few paragraphs to give you a feel for The First Book of Bees MAKING HONEY “Back at the hive, a field bee may give part of her load of nectar to a house bee. She opens her jaws and squeezes a drop of nectar out over her tongue. The house bee stretches her tongue out full-length and sips the nectar from the tongue of the field bee. Bees are most likely to do this on hot...

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The Writings of John Muir Volume IV...

Mar 11, 2014 by

The Writings of John Muir: Volume IV The Mountains of California was originally published in 1898. Yet another volume from John Muir of incredible nature writings, this volume centered on the mountains of California.  Here are a few lines from the opening of the book: “Making your way through the mazes of the Coast Eange to the summit of any of the inner peaks or passes opposite San. Francisco, in the clear spring time, the grandest and most telling of all California landscapes is outspread before you. At your feet lies the great Central Valley glowing golden in the sunshine, extending north and south farther than the eye can reach, one smooth, flowery, lake-like bed of fertile soil. Along its eastern margin rises the mighty Sierra, miles in height, reposing like a smooth, cumulous...

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How to Attract and Protect Wild Birds...

Nov 19, 2013 by

How to Attract and Protect Wild Birds by Martin Hiesemann was originally published in 1911. A must have for bird lovers everywhere! A few sentences from the preface of the book: “Most people have been struck by the increased attention that has recently been paid to the protection of birds, and they must have hailed this movement with delight. In newspapers, journals, books, and pamphlets we come across articles and essays dealing with the various attempts to promote this object ; while societies and communities, as well as individuals, exert themselves on all sides in the good cause. The energetic fashion in which Government authorities have taken up the question of the protection of birds on a rational basis deserves special mention. We need only refer here to the Paris Convention of June, 1895, which...

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The Yosemite Guide-Book (1869)

Nov 1, 2013 by

The Yosemite Guide-Book: description of the Yosemite Valley and the adjacent region of the Sierra Nevada, and of the big trees of California by J.D. Whitney was originally published in  1869. This is fascinating find most especially of course if you are someone who love Yosemite National Park.   There is much information in this volume that is not easily found anywhere else.  Enjoy! a few lines from the book: “The next prominent object, in going up the Valley, is the triple group of rocks known as the Three Brothers. These rise in steps one behind the other, the highest being 3,830 feet above the Valley. From the summit of this, there is a superb view of the Valley and its surroundings. The peculiar outline of these rocks, as seen from below, resembling three frogs...

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Sweet peas up-to-date, with a complete description of all known varieties...

Oct 23, 2013 by

Sweet peas up-to-date, with a complete description of all known varieties by G. W. Kerr was originally published in 1910 and is a must have if you are a a Sweet Pea lover.  No doubt there have been many new varieties added since the early 1900’s, but few things are as relaxing as reading a gardening book from 1910!    This book is also interesting because though it is written by G.W. Kerr the preface is written by W. Atlee Burpee & Co. – as in Burpee seeds.  Here are a few lines from the book’s introduction: “The Sweet Pea has a keel that was meant to seek all shores; it has wings that were meant to fly across all continents; it has a standard which is friendly to all nations; and it has a...

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Songs of a Sourdough

Sep 3, 2013 by

Songs of the Sourdough by Robert William Service is a beautiful poem that will take you deep into nature.   This is nature poetry at its finest. Here the Bard Of The Yukon use picture words that place the reader right in the Yukon of old. As you read you can see the stranger stagger in to the Malamute saloon and feel the fifty below gush of air until he closes the door behind him. You will hear him play the piano and see the ghastly look of the Lady that’s known as Lou. You too will jump for the floor when the shooting of Dangerous Dan McGrew starts. You too will hear the Call of The Yukon and understand its Law while you come to appreciate The Younger Son.” BUY this...

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Our National Parks

Jun 14, 2013 by

The Scottish-American John Muir is known as one of the early advocates for the preservation of American wilderness. He wrote many letters, essays and books chronicling his adventures and travels through the wild lands of American parks.  OUR NATIONAL PARKS is filled with sketches that were originally published in the Atlantic monthly and include: The wild parks and forest reservations of the west, The Yellowstone national park, The Yosemite national park, The forests of the Yosemite park, The wild gardens of the Yosemite park, Among the animals of the Yosemite, Among the birds of the Yosemite, The fountains and streams of the Yosemite national park, The Sequoia and General Grant national parks, The American forests. Here are a few paragraphs from the book to give you a feel for his writing: “The present rivers...

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Mariposa Grove of Big Trees

Feb 18, 2013 by

Mariposa Grove of Big Trees: a short history of the Mariposa big trees & the Yosemite Valley was originally published in 1910. I use the word fascinating a lot, but this history of the large trees in Yosemite lives up to the word. From the preface: This group is included in a tract of land that was granted to the state of California by the United States in 1864, and accepted by the State Legislature in 1866. The grant contains 2,589.26 acres. The name given to the Grove is due to the latter’s position in Mariposa county. Ceded to the United States by the State in 1905. The several groups that make this grove number 627 individual trees. When the species was discovered, botanists contended over the name, but finally adopted Sequoia Gigantea for...

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Villa Gardens (how to plan and how to plant them)...

Jan 27, 2013 by

Villa Gardens (how to plan and how to plant them) by W. S. Rogers was originally published in 1902 and is a very interesting little book. If you would like some early 1900’s help on how to plan and plant your villa’s garden….then this book is for you! Provides separate guidance for the “back garden” the “front garden” the “all around garden” the “vegetable garden” “garden walks” “rock gardens” the “summer house” “garden seats, arches, sundials etc” A few paragraphs from the introduction: “The limits of the villa garden are only too obvious. Its boundaries are always in evidence, and its size is so restricted that our first care should be to accord it treatment which may serve to make its squareness and small dimensions not too conspicuous. Such treatment must be based upon...

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Houseplants and How to Grow Them...

Jan 6, 2013 by

Houseplants and How to Grow Them by Parker Barnes was originally published in 1915 is a very cool old book all about, you guessed it – House Plants and How to Grow Them!  Lots of great ideas and hints to keep your plants happy and healthy year round. A few paragraphs from the book to give you a feel for it: SOME UNUSUAL BULBS “No window garden would be complete without some bulbous plants like amaryllis, calla, etc. The common calla (Richardia Africand) has been a favourite house plant for years, but, unfortunately, it has not always bloomed satisfactorily. The calla is a gross feeder, so needs rich soil. Let it contain, if possible, about one-third of well-rotted horse manure and the balance of rotted sod with enough sand to make good drainage. I...

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Fresh Air and How to Use It

Jan 5, 2013 by

Fresh Air and How to Use it by Thomas Carrington was originally published in 1912 and was originally published during a tuberculosis outbreak. This book is as current now as it was back then – the only caveat being you have to find some fresh air on this planet of ours first! A few lines from the introduction to give you a feel for the book: “The Relation of Fresh Air to Health The interiors of the majority of homes in northern countries are breeding places for disease, because of the difficulties in the way of and the objection to admitting fresh air. Foul air which is full of poisonous gases exhaled from the lungs of the inmates, is the usual atmosphere of the home, and it cannot be otherwise when our houses are...

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Deep Sea Surroundings and Explorations of the Bottom...

Dec 3, 2012 by

Deep Sea Surroundings and Explorations of the Bottom or The ultimate analysis of human knowledge by A.B. Johnson was originally published in 1861. It gives a fascinating peek into what was known about the sea during the 1860’s. A few paragraphs from the beginning of the book: “THE TRIPLICITY OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE. Possessing three organisms, and deriving through them all he knows, man’s knowledge is tri-form. This might have remained undiscovered, if Providence had not manifested, that specific organic defects, as blindness, deafness, and idiocy, occasion specific deficiencies of knowledge. All that a man sees, tastes, smells, hears, and feels, corporally, constitutes his physical knowledge ; all he feels emotionally constitutes his emotional knowledge ; and all he knows otherwise is intellectual. If he take the wings of the morning, and fly (in thought) to...

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