Fifty Years Among the Bees

Jun 13, 2015 by

Fifty Years Among the Bees by Dr. C. C. Miller was originally published in 1911 and is a must-have resource for anyone interested in keeping bees for hobby or profit.  If you love Langstroth’s “The Hive and the Honeybee” you will love this book too.  Dr. Miller is humble, funny and full of facts and information.  After keeping bees for fifty years he tells the reader that he doesn’t know everything about bees and beekeeping – but he does know what haw worked for him.  Wonderful knowledge and fun to read. Here are a few lines to give you a feel for his writing style: “As I said, I am not sure that it is ever wise, except in the Hastings apiary, to allow supers to stay on after the white-clover harvest is over....

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Irish Pioneers in Kentucky: a series of articles published in the Gaelic American...

May 30, 2015 by

Irish Pioneers in Kentucky: a series of articles published in the Gaelic American was originally published in 1916. Here’s a fascinating tidbit I just learned from this book: “The True Discoverer of Kentucky. Not Daniel Boone, as is Generally Supposed, but an Irish Pioneer named James McBride. Testimony of Impartial Historians. Our Irish-American literary and historical associations could do no better work than turn the searchlight on the early records of Kentucky. Of all the original Thirteen Colonies, none present a wider, more prolific or more interesting field for historical research than that portion of the Colony of Virginia, originally called Fincastle County, and which, in 1779, was formed into the State of Kentucky. It may be said that the early history of Kentucky is contemporary with that of Virginia and the Carolinas. It...

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Gaelic Songs Orain Ghaidhealach...

May 28, 2015 by

Gaelic Songs,  Orain Ghaidhealach by William Ross was originally published in 1937 and is a wonderful collection of old Gaelic “songs” or poems with English translation. Here for your enjoyment: “CONVERSATION BETWEEN THE BARD AND BLAVEN The Bard composed the following song while gazing over the top of a hill in Gairloch, at Blaven, the summit of Strath MacKinnon in the Isle of Skye, the native land of his ancestors. He entreats the Ben to ” sing the story of the age that is gone.” The Ben answers him, as it were, and declares that a sad change has come upon itself since the Bard’s ancestors ceased to frequent it. I sit on a lonely height, Gazing, musing, the lay saith ” The world’s guile, life’s poor respite, All flesh — are a prey...

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Gaelic Mythology

May 28, 2015 by

Gaelic Mythology by Hector MacLean was originally published in 1879. Awesome amazing book filled with information I have not been able to find in other places. Long lost and unavailable I’m so happy to have found this treasure. a few paragraphs from the intro for you: “The belief in the animation of inorganic nature still lingers in several parts of the Highlands, as well as the belief in fairies, ghosts, metamorphoses, and sorcery. Every hill, knoll, valley, dell, wood, river, lake, brook, well, bay, or rock seems to have had its spirit ; and sea, sky, winds, and clouds were imagined to be endued with a certain amount of consciousness, at a period not very remote from our own day in this part of Great Britain. In Campbell’s “Popular Tales of the West Highlands,”...

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Scottish Gaelic as a Specific Subject...

May 28, 2015 by

Scottish Gaelic as a Specific Subject by Comunn Gaidhealach was originally published by Archibald Sinclair in 1893. Here is the PREFACE from the book for more information about its contents: “This Grammar is designed principally for the teaching of the Scottish Gaelic Language as a specific subject under the Education Code for Scotland ; but it is meant also for other uses. Although there are at present several Gaelic Grammars in print, it is complained that none of them is suitable for the teaching of classes. The Highland Association has therefore undertaken to prepare and publish a new one, of which this is the first part. In the manner of treatment, the Compilers have gone off the beaten track, judging it best to exhibit the structure of the language in a way suited to...

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The Gaelic Class Book

May 25, 2015 by

The Gaelic Class Book by H. Cameron Gillies M.D. was originally published in 1896! Here are a few press releases for the book from 1896: Highland News. — ‘To say that Dr. Gillies’ Grammar is the best hitherto published of the Gaelic language would not possibly be accepted as anything highly flattering. Nevertheless, we must say that it is the best, far and away the best, grammar of the language yet published.’ Glasgow Herald. — ‘ We can heartily recommend this book.’ Northern Chronicle. — ‘Should be studied by all who wish to gain an insight into the archaic construction of the Gaelic language.’ Scotsman. — ‘ Is well based in a study of the historical development of the language and the results of modern comparative philology.’ Freemarìs Journal. — Dr. Gillies’ work is...

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MacLaren’s Gaelic Self-Taught...

May 23, 2015 by

MacLaren’s Gaelic Self-Taught by Alex MacLaren  third edition was originally published in 1923. A few wee words from Mr. MacLaren’s Preface: “It was my original intention merely to correct and revise Mr. James White MacLean’s”Introduction to Gaelic,” but as the revision progressed I found that I was practically re-writing the whole work so that the portion of it I was leaving intact had also to be re-written, regradedand arranged to suit the revised matter. The volume  present to the student is therefore an entirely new work. I have endeavaoured to keep the phonetic sounds as simple as possible ; some of the finer ones may have been omitted, but these may be left to be acquired as the student progresses.I have considered it inadvisable to follow the pronunciation of any one district. Varying dialects...

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Elementary Lessons in Gaelic with a Vocabulary and Key...

May 21, 2015 by

Elementary Lessons in Gaelic with a Vocabulary and a Key by Lachlan MacBean was originally published in 1889 and is an absolutely rare and priceless gem of a book if you are interested in the beautiful Gaelic language. Here’s a few wee examples of text from the book: “When two Vowels meet so that both cannot readily be  pronounced, the least important is omitted,and an apostrophe marks its place, as — Do’n (for do an) duine, to the man. A fundamental rule of Gaelic orthography is that Consonants be preceded and followed by Vowels of the same quality. Consonants preceded by a broad Vowel [a, or //) must not be followed by a small Vowel {e and /) or Tue Tersa. All Gaelic words are accented on the first syllable. The student should pronounce...

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Early Settlers of Alabama

May 21, 2015 by

Early Settlers of Alabama by Col. James Edmonds Saunders (with notes and genealogies by his granddaughter Elizabeth Saunders Blair Stubbs)  was originally published in 1899 and is chock full of interesting tidbits and history of Alabama. If you are from Alabama, or have relatives or ancestors from the great state of Alabama, this book will likely be of interest to you! A small taste from the PREFACE: “Colonel Saunders began in the April numbers of the “Moulton Advertiser,” 1880 (his county paper), a series of “letters” relating to the “Early Settlers of Lawrence  County” (Ala.) and the Tennessee Valley. These articles, increasing, year after year, in scope and valuable material, soon overran their limit, exacting tributary data from neighboring counties, the State, ad- joining States, and only to pause in that dear “Mother of...

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Early History of Middle Tennessee...

Sep 16, 2014 by

Early History of Middle Tennessee by Edward Albright originally published in 1909 is a must have resource for anyone whose family is originally from Tennessee, or for anyone with a passion for Tennessee history. Mr. Albright’s own words from his preface: “The history of Tennessee, and especially that of our own section of the State, was long sadly neglected, and it is now with the greatest difficulty that many of the isolated facts of tradition may be woven into a continuous thread of history. The failure of preceding generations to gather and record, first-handed, many of the stirring events of early times in the Cumberland Valley from those who participated in them, has increased the task of the historical writer of today. Only one other attempt has been made to write a history of...

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Civil War Household Tips

Sep 6, 2014 by

Every once in a while, in everyone’s life, there comes a time for a strange remedy. You know what I mean – an out-of-the-box answer to a question you find yourself pondering for days. Modern medicine just doesn’t seem to be fixing it – so what do you do? This, my friends, just might be the book to answer all your questions. Imagine…it’s the mid 19th century, 1860’s to be precise. Please keep in mind penicillin was not discovered by Alexander Fleming until 1928.  We take it all for granted now don’t we? we take for granted…small infections that disappear as soon as the doctor prescribes antibiotic cream, or perhaps you have some… shall we say “un-named” infection that is causing a blip in your regular day. You simply run to the doctor or...

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The Writings of John Muir Volume IV...

Mar 11, 2014 by

The Writings of John Muir: Volume IV The Mountains of California was originally published in 1898. Yet another volume from John Muir of incredible nature writings, this volume centered on the mountains of California.  Here are a few lines from the opening of the book: “Making your way through the mazes of the Coast Eange to the summit of any of the inner peaks or passes opposite San. Francisco, in the clear spring time, the grandest and most telling of all California landscapes is outspread before you. At your feet lies the great Central Valley glowing golden in the sunshine, extending north and south farther than the eye can reach, one smooth, flowery, lake-like bed of fertile soil. Along its eastern margin rises the mighty Sierra, miles in height, reposing like a smooth, cumulous...

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