Irish Pioneers in Kentucky: a series of articles published in the Gaelic American...

May 30, 2015 by

Irish Pioneers in Kentucky: a series of articles published in the Gaelic American was originally published in 1916. Here’s a fascinating tidbit I just learned from this book: “The True Discoverer of Kentucky. Not Daniel Boone, as is Generally Supposed, but an Irish Pioneer named James McBride. Testimony of Impartial Historians. Our Irish-American literary and historical associations could do no better work than turn the searchlight on the early records of Kentucky. Of all the original Thirteen Colonies, none present a wider, more prolific or more interesting field for historical research than that portion of the Colony of Virginia, originally called Fincastle County, and which, in 1779, was formed into the State of Kentucky. It may be said that the early history of Kentucky is contemporary with that of Virginia and the Carolinas. It...

read more

Early Settlers of Alabama

May 21, 2015 by

Early Settlers of Alabama by Col. James Edmonds Saunders (with notes and genealogies by his granddaughter Elizabeth Saunders Blair Stubbs)  was originally published in 1899 and is chock full of interesting tidbits and history of Alabama. If you are from Alabama, or have relatives or ancestors from the great state of Alabama, this book will likely be of interest to you! A small taste from the PREFACE: “Colonel Saunders began in the April numbers of the “Moulton Advertiser,” 1880 (his county paper), a series of “letters” relating to the “Early Settlers of Lawrence  County” (Ala.) and the Tennessee Valley. These articles, increasing, year after year, in scope and valuable material, soon overran their limit, exacting tributary data from neighboring counties, the State, ad- joining States, and only to pause in that dear “Mother of...

read more

Early History of Middle Tennessee...

Sep 16, 2014 by

Early History of Middle Tennessee by Edward Albright originally published in 1909 is a must have resource for anyone whose family is originally from Tennessee, or for anyone with a passion for Tennessee history. Mr. Albright’s own words from his preface: “The history of Tennessee, and especially that of our own section of the State, was long sadly neglected, and it is now with the greatest difficulty that many of the isolated facts of tradition may be woven into a continuous thread of history. The failure of preceding generations to gather and record, first-handed, many of the stirring events of early times in the Cumberland Valley from those who participated in them, has increased the task of the historical writer of today. Only one other attempt has been made to write a history of...

read more

The Writings of John Muir Volume IV...

Mar 11, 2014 by

The Writings of John Muir: Volume IV The Mountains of California was originally published in 1898. Yet another volume from John Muir of incredible nature writings, this volume centered on the mountains of California.  Here are a few lines from the opening of the book: “Making your way through the mazes of the Coast Eange to the summit of any of the inner peaks or passes opposite San. Francisco, in the clear spring time, the grandest and most telling of all California landscapes is outspread before you. At your feet lies the great Central Valley glowing golden in the sunshine, extending north and south farther than the eye can reach, one smooth, flowery, lake-like bed of fertile soil. Along its eastern margin rises the mighty Sierra, miles in height, reposing like a smooth, cumulous...

read more

Recollections of the Civil War: From A Child’s Point of View...

Nov 22, 2013 by

Recollections of the Civil War: From a Child’s Point of View by Maud E. Morrow was originally published in 1901 and is a must have for those interested in the U.S. Civil War. Written from a child’s point of view by a woman whose mother worked in a hospital during the civil war.  The author as a child was at the hospital as well – here is the introduction to give you an idea of the content: “PREFACE OR APOLOGY When one writes a book, a preface is in order. Mine shall be by way of explanation. The only apology I have to offer for writing- this little personal story is the very simple one that it is true. It has been said that “we never talk so well as when talking of ourselves.”...

read more

The Rural School Lunch

Nov 7, 2013 by

The Rural School Lunch by Nellie Wing Farnsworth was originally published in 1916.  What a find! Nellie wrote this as a guidebook for teachers and school administrators during the early 1900’s so that they would be able to make warm school lunches for the students. It has some great basic good recipes too using all natural ingredients. I’ve posted the potato soup recipe below as well as a few paragraphs from the opening of the book: “On the principle that anything worth doing is worth doing well, it might follow that anything that must be done must be done well. We do not live to eat, but we must eat to live. Study, work, play are all alike destructive of bodily tissue and necessitate repair. Children must have extra food for growth besides repair,...

read more

The Yosemite Guide-Book (1869)

Nov 1, 2013 by

The Yosemite Guide-Book: description of the Yosemite Valley and the adjacent region of the Sierra Nevada, and of the big trees of California by J.D. Whitney was originally published in  1869. This is fascinating find most especially of course if you are someone who love Yosemite National Park.   There is much information in this volume that is not easily found anywhere else.  Enjoy! a few lines from the book: “The next prominent object, in going up the Valley, is the triple group of rocks known as the Three Brothers. These rise in steps one behind the other, the highest being 3,830 feet above the Valley. From the summit of this, there is a superb view of the Valley and its surroundings. The peculiar outline of these rocks, as seen from below, resembling three frogs...

read more

The Negro Trail Blazers of California...

Oct 31, 2013 by

The Negro Trail Blazers of California; a compilation of records from the California Archives in the Bancroft Library at the University of California by Delilah Beasley was originally published in 1919. From the book’s introduction: “This is a compilation of records from the California Archives in the Bancroft Library at the University of California, in Berkeley; and from the Diaries, Old Papers and Conversations of Old Pioneers in the State of California. It is a True Record of Facts, as They Pertain to the History of the Pioneer and Present Day Negroes of California.” and from the Foreword: “The author’s reason for presenting a book of this kind to the public at this time is not due to the fact that she is not cognizant of the fact that, within the past fifty-four years,...

read more

Songs of a Sourdough

Sep 3, 2013 by

Songs of the Sourdough by Robert William Service is a beautiful poem that will take you deep into nature.   This is nature poetry at its finest. Here the Bard Of The Yukon use picture words that place the reader right in the Yukon of old. As you read you can see the stranger stagger in to the Malamute saloon and feel the fifty below gush of air until he closes the door behind him. You will hear him play the piano and see the ghastly look of the Lady that’s known as Lou. You too will jump for the floor when the shooting of Dangerous Dan McGrew starts. You too will hear the Call of The Yukon and understand its Law while you come to appreciate The Younger Son.” BUY this...

read more

The Art of Preserving Teeth

Jun 27, 2013 by

The Art of Preserving Teeth was originally published in 1824 by Nathaniel Peabody, and gives a fascinating look into dental care in the early 1800’s…….! a few lines from Mr. Peabody re: “powder” “The question is often asked, ” What is the best powder for the teeth ?” The answer is, any simple powder, which will operate as a polisher of the teeth, and which will have no other than a mechanical effect. I have prepared and used a variety of dentifrices upon the teeth, and finally am of opinion, that charcoal, or coal thoroughly burnt, and pulverized, forms one of the most innocent polishers for the teeth. But this may be made of charcoal so impure, and so badly prepared as to be injurious to the teeth. It ought to be, like all...

read more

The Planters of Colonial Virginia...

Jun 27, 2013 by

THE PLANTERS OF COLONIAL VIRGINIA by Thomas Wertenbaker was first published in 1922. A few lines from chapter 1: “England in the New World At the beginning of the Seventeenth century colonial expansion had become for England an economic necessity. Because of the depletion of her forests, which constituted perhaps the most important of her natural resources, she could no longer look for prosperity from the old industries that for centuries had been her mainstay. In the days when the Norman conquerors first set foot upon English soil the virgin woods, broken occasionally by fields and villages, had stretched in dense formation from the Scottish border to Sussex and Devonshire. But with the passage of five centuries a great change had been wrought. The growing population, the expansion of agriculture, the increasing use of...

read more

Our Home Physician Vol 1 (1869)...

Jun 27, 2013 by

Our Home Physician Vol 1 (1869): a new and popular guide to the art of preserving health and treating disease; with plain advice for all the medical and surgical emergencies of the family  Authored by George Miller Beard was originally published in 1869 and gives a very clear picture of medical care during the mid to late 1800’s.  This book will make you send a thank you note to your doctor! A few words from George Miller Beard on being a physician in 1869… to give you a feel for this fascinating old book: “The physician, especially the country practitioner, cannot adjust his hours of labor according to hygienic principles. The life of a faithful, successful practitioner must, then, be one of exposure, anxiety, and irregular toil. The city physician is often able to...

read more