The Argyleshire Pronouncing Gaelic Dictionary : to which is prefixed a concise but most comprehensive Gaelic Grammar

May 24, 2015 by

argyleshireThe Argyleshire Pronouncing Gaelic Dictionary: to which is prefixed a concise but most comprehensive Gaelic Grammar by Neil M’Alpine (MacAlpine) was originally published in 1866.

“PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR,  AND SOLD BY ALL THE BOOKSELLERS IN THE KINGDOM,
AND ON THE CONTINENT; ALSO BY ALL THE SCHOOLMASTERS IN THE HIGHLANDS. ”

This is an amazing find and a must have for lovers of the Gaelic language.Here is a tiny bit from the book to give you a feel for it:

“Verb is a word signifying to be, to do, or to suffer. In Gaelic there are two conjugations, the first comprehending all the verbs beginning with consonants except f ; the se-ond all beginning with f,
or a vowel.
2. There are two voices, active and passive.
3. There are in Gaelic only, in common with the Hebrew and other Oriental languages,
two VOICES, the PAST and the future ; however, by a stroke of Gaelic generalship
unknown in modern tactics, our Gaelic grammarians have discovered a present tense, but very wisely kept it a secret in
their own bosoms.”

RUDIMENTS OF GAELIC GRAMMAR

Feminine Polysyllables have commonly their nominatives and genitives plural alike; as, linntean, generations, or of
generations ; cridheachean, hearts, or ohearts ; dùil, element, has dull, — Dia nan dull, the God of the elements ; all these
irre- gularities are met with in their respective places in the Dictionary.

Dative and Vocative Plural. Words of one syllable form their datives by adding ibh— in all other cases they are like the nom.;
thevoc. being the aspirate form — Cailleachan, nuns ; O ehailleachan ! nuns ‘.
Sex by three ways. 1st, By different Words. slates. Females.

Fleasgach, stripling. Gruagach, cailinn,
Righ, hing. Banrighinn, queen,

Balach, boy ; boor. Caile, girl ; quean.
Balachan, boy. Caileag, little girl.”

 

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